What Is Insomnia?

Insomnia is a condition where a patient experiences difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, even when he or she is tired and in a comfortable sleeping environment. Remedy sees patients who feel dissatisfied with the quality and quantity of their sleep and are experiencing at least one of the following symptoms: fatigue, low energy, difficulty concentrating, mood disturbances, and decreased performance in work or at school. Insomnia occurs in both acute and chronic forms, depending on its duration.

Acute insomnia usually only lasts for a night or two and is usually due to a specific event or concern, like nervousness about a specific event or sometimes after receiving bad news. Chronic insomnia, however, occurs at least 3 nights each week and lasts for at least 3. Chronic insomnia can be caused by a number of factors including mental health disorders, hormonal imbalances, unhealthy sleep habits, or certain medications.

Why Is Good Sleep Important?

Insomnia leads to daytime fatigue which causes problems with intellectual function and mental/emotional responses. If a patient is already suffering from certain mental health issues, insomnia can magnify some of the symptoms. It also affects the immune system, making the patient more susceptible to other illnesses. Poor sleep leads to an increase in irritability, poor cognitive function, weight gain, and more.

How is Insomnia Treated?

Remedy often treats patients who suffer from insomnia as a symptom of a mental health issue or as a side effect from certain medications. Often we start with supplements that may help insomnia, then over-the-counter suggestions, and then in some cases, prescribed medications for insomnia.

Our Remedy team has had extensive training on psychopharmacology and has a thorough understanding of not only the potential side effects of drugs but also the unintended consequences of some drug interactions. Make sure to share the full list of any medications or supplements you take including vitamins and herbal supplements with your Remedy psychiatric provider. If there is a potential interaction between any of the drugs you take, your psychiatric provider will address that situation.